Crooked

or Lean In: Old World Style

It’s a season of political campaigns in the States, so the word “crooked” seems to pop up at every turn.  It’s tiring, to say the least, so let’s turn this beast around.  Today’s post is brought to you by the word “crooked,” as seen through the eyes of European town squares.

Spitzhausen (from the 1400's): A gloriously crooked house in Bernkastel-Kues leans in toward the street.
Spitzhausen (from the 1400’s): A gloriously crooked house in Bernkastel-Kues leans in toward the street.

 

Bernkastel-Kues, on the Mosel River.  Crooked floors in a half-timber house.
Bernkastel-Kues, on the Mosel River. Crooked floors in a half-timber house.
Old Town Square, Prague
Old Town Square, Prague

 

Colmar, France. Crooked streets where everything leans in--and it only adds to the beauty.
Colmar, France. Crooked streets where everything leans in–and it only adds to the beauty.

 

Misaligned photo of that crooked Leaning Tower of Pisa.  And somehow my husband's head has been obscured by my daughter's raincoat. Nothing lined up right here!
Misaligned photo of that crooked Leaning Tower of Pisa. And somehow my husband’s head has been obscured by my daughter’s raincoat. Nothing lined up right here!

 

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8 thoughts on “Crooked

    1. Absolutely! You know, they say that the stage set for Diagon Alley was partly inspired by “The Shambles” in York, England. I should have included a photo of that road–it is charmingly crooked and winding! Thanks for reading!

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